i like music probably and pokemon

(mostly everything is tagged)

el-lime-head:

lissycposts:

Andy Goldsworthy’s art

FFS I had to research this fucker in year 8 art and I never appreciated his work until now

(via a-khaleesi-not-a-queen)

laughterbynight:

jtgjosh:

LETS GET SUPER SPOOOOOOOOPY

get spoopy with meh

My blog is going to be this shit until November. Now’s the time to escape if you want.

(via tobirionspookyedition)

dajo42:

interesting superpowers

  • making people forget about object permanence
  • growing a wing. just one. fly around in circles
  • summoning vaseline
  • changing the colour of objects into their complimentary colour
  • super speed but only when drunk
  • instantly mastering the swear words in any language

(via violet-amporas)

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via a-khaleesi-not-a-queen)

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

(Source: shogunofyellow, via cement-roses)

G major is the happiest key out there. Like, it just makes you want to dance. And then there’s D minor, which is the saddest, and just makes you want to crawl into a hole and eat Cheeze-its.
written by my music theory professor on the happiest and saddest sounding keys (via thingsmymusicprofessorssay)

(via moffatrippedoutmysoul)

bloggish:

how the hell did we get the idea pink isn’t a cool colour

because scientifically speaking pink doesn’t even exist; it fits between violet and red on the spectrum but actually what goes there is infrared and ultraviolet and all those things we can’t see

pink is the ambassador of an otherworldly and unknowable realm it is the most badass colour out there

(via spencerofspace)

pipermclean-ing:

unlimitedgoats:

luxvriously:

My anaconda will consider it

My anaconda has, upon review of the information presented with it’s partners, decided that it, in fact, does not. My anaconda apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks you for your time.

hun

(via an-augustus-waters-fetish)

the speech is on economics so it’s reserved for econ students mostly and maybe some of the public?? it was unclear about that but clear about the fact that i am not invited

the speech is on economics so it’s reserved for econ students mostly and maybe some of the public?? it was unclear about that but clear about the fact that i am not invited

Anonymous said: About the mflb issue, if you wanna order one but don't wanna order it to your place of residence, most head shops will take requests. Just go in n ask, provided you're of legal age, and they'll likely order one in for you, since you know, they get money out of the deal and all.

i think i’ll do that, actually! thank you. (i’m actually still seventeen but all my friends are of age)

OBAMA IS GIVING A SPEECH AT MY SCHOOL IN 2 DAYS AND IM NOT ALLOWED TO ATTEND

korranation:

There’s a new clip from Book 4 episode 1 online and it gives us a glimpse at what Opal & Kai’s new jobs are!

Here’s the clip

eshusplayground:

il-tenore-regina:

She’s the antithesis of a Disney Princess.

She was a politician, tactician, nationalist and war leader who wasn’t afraid to duel her brother to the death in order to gain the throne.

That’s a fucking princess. She did things. And we live in a…

… “You must have shown me real loyalty down in the Chamber. Nothing but that could’ve called Fawkes to you.” That’s the very first thing Dumbledore thanks and praises Harry for. Not for rescuing Ginny, or saving the school from the basilisk, or for keeping Voldemort from coming back, but for loyalty.

Dumbledore judges the people he works with based first and foremost on how loyal they are to him. Not because he thinks he’s all that, but because, as I said, he views people as game pieces, and you can’t have your game pieces acting up, can you? He values his pieces. He wants to advance and protect them. But he doesn’t want them running off beyond his sphere of influence and doing their own thing. I think there’s something very ambiguous about Dumbledore’s habit of seeking out desperate, socially outcast people and doing them one or two huge favors that leave them bound to him for life. Remus, Hagrid and Snape all fit that pattern, and Trelawney and Firenze appear to join the ranks in OOP. It kind of makes me wonder what Dumbledore has done for Fletcher, Moody and Shacklebolt.

…The problem with Sirius is, he’s not loyal to Dumbledore at all; he’s loyal to Harry. From Dumbledore’s point of view, it’s as if he’s playing wizard chess, and one of the knights suddenly decides that he doesn’t care what happens to the king, he’s just going to take care of that little pawn on the left. So Dumbledore does the only thing he thinks he can do — he sticks his recalcitrant knight into a safe, isolated corner of the board and keeps him from making any moves. Perfectly sensible and strategically sound, as long as you don’t expect your game pieces to have any pesky emotions or psychological issue that need to be taken into account.

…Dumbledore’s actions at Hogwarts are another symptom of his general approach. He doesn’t treat it just as a school, but also as an instrument in his strategy. People like Snape, Hagrid and Trelawny — all lousy teachers, in very different ways — are given their jobs as perks, because of their past of future usefulness to the Order, and because it strengthens their bonds of loyalty to Dumbledore.

OTOH, look at Lupin, who is a talented teacher. Why wasn’t he hired before Harry’s third year, especially given the difficulty of finding qualified DADA professors? My theory is that Dumbledore didn’t consider it necessary. As far as he knew, Lupin was already totally loyal simply because Dumbledore had allowed him to attend Hogwarts. There was no need to bribe him with a job. He was hired only when his familiarity with Sirius became an important factor. Once Sirius proved not to be a threat, Lupin was allowed to resign…


written by Thoughts on Dumbledore by marinarusalka, from hp-essays (via pottersir)

 

(via siriuus)

(Source: pottersir, via punkmarauder)